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Thomas Erl

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Top Stories by Thomas Erl

Many are comparing notes on two well-publicized paths to achieving SOA. The bottom-up approach is currently the most common variety, where Web services are created on an "as need" basis to fulfill mostly integration-related requirements. These services are typically application specific and simply re-create traditional integration channels over the open Web services communication framework. The top-down approach, on the other hand, is one of analysis, deep thought, and patience. Service-orientation is infused into the business process layer so that services can be modeled in alignment with business models. The models themselves may need to be built or further refined in order to fully incorporate service-orientation principles. Then, of course, there's the middle ground - an approach that tries to balance the requirements of the top-down strategy with the efficiency... (more)

Exclusive SOA Web Services Journal Briefing – Thomas Erl On SOA

With the unwavering prominence of service-oriented architecture (SOA) there is an increasing interest in understanding what exactly it means for something to be considered "service-oriented." Thomas Erl recently completed a lengthy research project for SOA Systems Inc. into the origins of SOA and the current state of service-orientation among all primary SOA technology platforms. This body of work contributed to the mainstream SOA methodology developed by SOA Systems and was also documented in Thomas's new book, Service-Oriented Architecture: Concepts, Technology, and Design. We ... (more)

SOA Pattern of the Week (#1): Service Façade

One of the fundamental goals when designing service-oriented solutions is to attain a reduced degree of coupling between services, thereby increasing the freedom and flexibility with which services can be individually evolved. Achieving the right level of coupling "looseness" is most often considered a design issue that revolves around the service contract and the consumer programs that form dependencies upon it. However, for the service architect there are opportunities to establish intermediate layers of abstraction within the service implementation that further foster reduced... (more)

SOA Pattern of the Week (#4): Service Normalization

Like data normalization, the Service Normalization pattern is intent on reducing redundancy and waste in order to avoid the governance burden associated with having to maintain and synchronize similar or duplicate bodies of service logic." You can see it introduces the Pattern on our publisher page. When designing data architectures, you can easily end up with different databases or even different database tables containing the same or similar data. This has been the root of many well documented data maintenance and quality issues that helped establish data normalization as widel... (more)

Cloud Computing, SOA and Windows Azure - Part 4

For a complete list of the co-authors and contributors, see the end of the article. The following section demonstrates the creation of a simple "Hello World" service in a Windows Azure hosted application. Note: If you are carrying out the upcoming steps with Visual Studio 2008, you will need to be in an elevated mode (such as Administrator). A convenient way of determining whether the mode setting is correct is to press the F5 key in order to enter debug mode. If you receive an error stating "the development fabric must be run elevated," then you will need to restart Visual Studi... (more)